Produce Photography

Libby's Squash, Walker farm, Dummerston, Vt

Libby’s Egg Plant, Walker Farm, Dummerston, Vt

If spring is flower season, the late summer and autumn are definitely produce season.  It is a nice time to photograph and a great time to eat the magnificent bounty of our brief but exuberant growing season.
For more delicious produce images check out the album on my getting it Right in the Digital Camera Blog 
Walker Farm Dummerston Vermont

Walker Farm, Dummerston Vt

Whenever I tag along with Susan to one of our many markets or farm stands, it is understood that my job is to photograph while she selects the wonderful stuff for diner.  This time of year there is an abundance of delicious native produce.  Green Mountain Orchard in Putney Vermont is our favorite spot for all sorts of pick-your-own fruits, especially Blueberries and Apples.  Macs, Macouns, Cortlands, Granny Smiths and Red Delicious, they have all the popular apples in addition to many early and heirloom varieties.  Of course I’m attracted by Green Mountain’s location, on top of Vermont’s rolling hills.

Blueberry Row, Green Mt. Orchard, Dummerston Vt

Blueberry Row, Green Mt. Orchard, Dummerston Vt

 

Harvest Ears at Walker farm, Dummerston Vt

Harvest Ears at Walker farm, Dummerston Vt

One of my favorite local farm stands is the Walker Farm along Route 5 in Dummerston Vermont.  In the spring I always hit the farm to capture the beautifully cultivated greenhouse flowers and this time of year it is all about the produce.  Walker Farm always has the best tasting AND the best looking local vegetables and fruits and they are always displayed in attractive arrangements that make it easy to construct my consumable compositions. It also helps that the friendly staff never seem to mind my “pixel grazing” through their ripe consumables.  For my part, I try not to trip the paying customers.  A monopod is much less intrusive than a spindly tripod.

 

 

 

Shinning Peppers, walker farm, Dumerston Vt

Shinning Peppers, walker farm, Dumerston Vt

Produce photography shares all the usual rules of light and composition.  I always approach fruits and vegetables as I would any landscape scene.  I look for a focus of interest, usually in the foreground, and a background which compliments the scene, and doesn’t present too much cluttered or flares of distracting bright light.  Vegetables tend to have shiny skins and although splashes of glimmering reflection can be attractive, more often softer light can allow the rich colors to shine through.  This is where a polarizing filter and a diffuser can help.  Many small farm stands benefit from shady natural light, although the Walker Farm has warm incandescent lighting that can be a challenge for color balance and reflections.  As always shooting in RAW improves the ability to adjust the color balance and tame the high dynamic range.

 

Too much garden, Our first plowing Spofford NH

Too much garden, Our first plowing Spofford NH

Of course we don’t need to wait for produce to arrive at the farm stand.  I enjoy capturing the fruits and vegetables when they are still on the vines or suspended from the branches.  When we first settled in New Hampshire, Susan and I slaved over an 80×80 foot monster vegetable garden.  It was great to grow corn, peas, beans, tomatoes, squash and more.  We loved teaching our kids where all the food actually came from, but as our children grew, pulling weeds in the garden lost its attraction.  For awhile we were able to get them to join us on pick-your-own expeditions, but then they became teenagers and had no interest in even acknowledging our existence.  Our garden steadily shrunk, as we realized that we were spending our entire summer planting, weeding and canning, and now all that remains is an herb garden, my apple trees and potted tomatoes on the deck.  I should also mention the squash and tomatoes that inevitably emerge from our compost bin.  We never know what we are going to get, but they always show vigorous, well fertilized, growth.

Lettuce at Stonewall Farm, Keene, NH

Lettuce at Stonewall Farm, Keene, NH

 

Honey Crisps at Keene Farmer's Market

Honey Crisps at Keene Farmer’s Market

Happily there is no shortage of local farms which provide abundant opportunities to explore along the rows of produce.  My favorites include the Stonewall Farm in Keene New Hampshire, Alyson’s Orchard in Walpole New Hampshire and of course Walker Farm.  Stonewall Farm is primarily a dairy farm, but as an educational institution it also has nicely managed vegetable gardens,  Like Green Mountain Orchard, Alyson’s has rows of apple trees in a beautiful hill-top setting, with beautiful sunsets overlooking the Connecticut River Valley.

 

Pumpkin Sunset, Alyson's Orchard, Walpole NH

Pumpkin Sunset, Alyson’s Orchard, Walpole NH

As the days begin to cool, we are all anticipating the fall colors, but while we wait for that glorious explosion we can enjoy the great visual display of nature’s abundance.  Now, I need fresh corn on the cob for diner and we are almost out of Blueberries.  Time to hit the road.

Produce Season Album

Photographing all of the New England Autumn

Jeffrey Newcomer
Partridgebrookreflections.com

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