Dreaming of Spring

 

Barn Afloat

Barn Afloat

 

Spring Sheep

Spring Sheep

Early March is traditionally the “Enough is Enough” season in New England, and this year, more than usual, we have enjoyed more than enough of the glories of winter. The photographic opportunities in winter are like no other time of the year with the snow cover and the special light transforming and simplifying the landscape into its essence of line and form. Every year, I become excited about the onset of winter and impatient for the first snows, but now I’m done and it is time for the remarkable explosion of spring to take command. After last year’s depressingly bitterly cold winter, I practiced, early March, “Blog Therapy” by publishing a spring preview with some of my favorite images.  As this winter begins to break, the need for a breath of sweet renewal seems no less imperative. So here, primarily for my own desperate benefit, I have collected a few images from last spring. It IS coming! De-ice your gear and get prepared. It will soon be time to switch from monochromatic black and white to the glory of the infinite variety of shades of green.

 

The Emergence
 

Birth Spiral

Birth Spiral

Even before the snow has fully melted away we will see the buds emerging in their desperate attempt to gain a head start on the short growing season. Last year I focused on macro shots of the early sprouts which explode in a remarkable variety of bizarre forms and colors. It lasts only a few days, but it is almost a disappointment when the leaves mature into the comparatively dull flat forms that will dominate the majority of the summer.

 

Falling Water Season

Pulpit Falls

Pulpit Falls

Early spring is often described as “Mud Season.” Struggle as I may I have found few ways to make muddy roads and pastures appear photographically attractive. It is much like the desolation of late fall “Stick Season,” but the saving factor in the spring is the glory of the falling water. All that melting snow mixes with the spring rain to cause torrential leaks in our roofs, but it also fills the many brooks and streams to reveal our waterfalls to their thunderous best. Many waterfalls that had dwindled to an insignificant trickle in late summer will roar to life in a few weeks.

Last spring I set myself on a quest to highlight many of my favorite waterfalls in the Monadnock Region and to discover others about which I had only heard rumors.

Fay Falls

Fay Falls

I published several articles about the falling waters including one covering many of my favorite waterfalls in Cheshire County. My most challenging quest was to find the elusive Pulpit Falls in Winchester  New Hampshire. It took three trips, bushwhacking through the deep snow and following a number of false leads, but I was finally led by the thunder into the small valley which hides this beautiful falls. It was worth the struggle and as a bonus, while Nellie and I were exploring the cascades, we met Kris Smith, of Wicked Dark Photography. It was Kris’ blog article that initially triggered my obsession to find the falls. Where else but in New England could you stumble across your goal and the muse who led you to it at the same time. On other explorations I was able to find Fay Falls in Walpole, NH and the waterfall at Ashuelot Gorge in Gilsum, New Hampshire.

 

Spring Leafscapes, The Second Autumn

Leafscape

Leafscape

Every spring I am freshly entranced by the infinitely varied palate of greens which burst across our forests. The colors are as exciting in their soft and delicate tones as are the garishly brilliant colors of our New England autumn. Last spring I took the time to truly notice the early colors and I posted some of my favorites in an article which zoomed in on the “Spring Leafscapes.” Of course the advantage of the spring colors is that, after they fade, we don’t find ourselves immediately saddled with the chore of raking them up.

 

 

May Hillside

May Hillside

 

Spring Wildflowers

White Trillium

White Trillium

What can I say about the spring explosion of wildflowers. Only that their shamelessly profligate display of color is the perfect antidote to the dull monotones of the long winter. Last spring I discovered the Fox Forest in Hillsborough, New Hampshire. On a couple of early spring hikes through this varied and lovely forest I was able to sample a number of the areas wildflowers including a few varieties of Trillium and the tiny White Star. Along the trail, I was helped in identifying the lavish flora by Kris Smith who has a remarkable depth of knowledge about the plants of the New England forests. Every spring I also accompany my wife to Walker Farm in Dummerston, Vermont where I practice flower photography larceny  by capturing the beautifully prepared flowers in the soft light and calm winds found in the farm’s green house. Forgive me.

 

Spring Cluster

Spring Cluster at Walker Farm, Brattleboro, VT

 

Emerging Wildlife

Dancing Lady

Dancing Lady

Spring is also a time to celebrate new and refreshed animal life, both wild and domestic. It is inspiring to share in the excitement of the horses, cattle and sheep as they frolic in the sweat new grass of their pastures, and there is no more dramatic example of this enthusiasm than the “Annual Dancing of the Ladies” at the Stonewall Farm in Keene, New Hampshire. Every spring, on a day set by the greening of the pastures, the public is invited to witness the crazy antics of the cows as they are released from the barn for the first time to graze on the fresh grass. It has become a community rite of spring to watch these normally placid animals jump and prance through the field. The running, leaping and head bumping last only a few minutes before the cows return to their normal semi-comatose status, but as compensation for the briefness of the entertainment, the farm provides a delicious pancake breakfast. Sadly, last year, I missed the dancing ladies, but I’ll be watching for the announcement of the date of this year’s festivities.

 

One of my favorite local farms is Roads End in Chesterfield, New Hampshire. The farm keeps over 60 horses for their summer riding camp and it is a pleasure to see the animals gleefully reclaim their rolling pastures.

Pasture Slope

Pasture Slope, Roads End farm

 

Eagle Descending

Eagle Descending

 

The non-domesticated New England wildlife is more difficult to capture but no less enthusiastic about surviving another bitter winter. Each spring I watch for the foxes, deer, turkeys and the Bald Eagles, who become more active along the lakes and the Connecticut River as the ice begins to open.

 

 

Black Fly

Black Fly

 

 

 

Of course the most prevalent and annoying of our spring visitors are the Black Flies. They are New Hampshire’s unofficial state “bird,” far too easy to find but difficult to photograph, except in the, much preferred, squashed mode.

 

 

 

I hope this glimpse of last year’s spring will be a welcomed escape from our “Enough is Enough” season and that it will prepare you to fully appreciate the glories that are to come.

For more images of the coming awakening, check out my Spring Album on my Getting it Right in the Digital Camera Blog.

Spring Links 2014

Partridge Brook Reflections Spring Gallery

~ Jeffrey Newcomer
partridgebrookreflections.com
603-363-8338

 

This entry was posted in Birds, Chesterfield, farms, Flowers, Forest, Gardens, Insects, Landscape, Macro, Monadnock, Nature, New Hampshire, Scenic New England, Spring, Stick Season, Vermont, Water falls, Wildflowers, Wildlife and tagged , , , , , , , , , , .